Canadian Mill Gondolas – Part 3 TH&B 2358

TH&B 2519 at Kinnear Yard, October 9, 1988. 2519 was scrapped at Intermetco in Welland, ON on May 24, 1989. Lance Brown photo.

TH&B 2519 at Kinnear Yard, October 9, 1988. 2519 was scrapped at Intermetco in Welland, ON on May 24, 1989. Lance Brown photo.

This is a continuation of a series about modelling Canadian mill gondolas.  In the previous post I outlined the process for modifying at P2K to more accurately represent a Canadian gondola.  In this post, I’ll discuss the TH&B repainting practices, and then show you how my factory painted model turned out.

Lance Brown provided some photos and history on some of the TH&B gondolas.  Here, two examples from the 2500 series are shown, above and below.   Primary documents for 2519 are curious.  Car Shops documents indicate that this car was repaired in February 1980, during which time it received new floors and paint.  Mechanical Dept. records (up to the end of the TH&B in December of 1986) make no further mention of this car.  Car Control indicates this car was held for heavy repairs as of November 10 1981. Notice the simplified logo showing a white outline and white letters. TH&B 2512 (below) was also repainted since delivery from National Steel Car, but had the original style logo applied at the time of the repaint.

TH&B 2512

TH&B 2512 at Aberdeen Yard, June 1986.  Lance Brown photo.

The above two photos prove the mixing of heralds when cars were repainted.  I chose to keep my model in it’s factory applied repaint scheme, though I have yet to seek out information on whether this car had the simplified herald applied at the time of the repaint.

Here are some shots of my model of TH&B 52’6″ mill gondola 2358 made from a P2K’s model of a Greenville car.  Obviously, this model is the least accurate of the three that I built because of the major discrepancy with the configuration of the ends.

Aging of this car was done using heat to deform the sides and ends, and then chalks and an airbrush to apply weathering.  A pastel dust of a variety of colours and some random trash was glued down to the floor because I’ve rarely seen a completely empty gondola.  Finally, I brushed on small spots of Microsol Gloss to represent oil or water puddles/stains on the floor.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Canadian Mill Gondolas – Part 3 TH&B 2358

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s