The Pulp Train and the President

We were talking about the pulp train at the club tonight, and my friend Ted gave me more insight and related an funny anecdote.

Turns out there were actually two pulp trains.  The Ramsey Swing portion of the pulp train took empties from Cartier to the E.B. Eddy loading facility at Ramsey (mileage 70.7 on the Nemegos Subdivision), swapped them for loads then returned back to Cartier yard.  The Nairn Turn is the train we refer to as ‘the pulp train.’  This job takes the loads that the Ramsey Swing brought in earlier and forwards them to the E.B. Eddy plant on the Pineland Spur just west of Nairn.  After swapping loads for empties at the Pineland Spur, the Nairn Turn retraces its route back to Cartier. I outlined the details of operating that job in my previous post.

Ted related an interesting anecdote about the pulp train.  Apparently, Bruce Chapman, who worked all over the CPR in northern Ontario was working in Sudbury in the late 70s.  One day he found himself responsible for finding replacement power for the pulp train as it died in Sudbury on one of its daily runs.  With nothing else to use, he assigned two nearly new SD40-2s to the train.  Just as the train was about to leave the yard, Bill Stinson, then President of the CPR, arrived at the division headquarters to find brand new engines coupling onto this lowly train.  To make matters worse, the Webbwood Subdivision was strictly four-axle territory.  Stinson questioned Chapman about this, but he got a laugh out of it when the situation was related to him.  Stinson remembered Chapman from then on.   We might have to represent that day at one of the WRMRC operating sessions.

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